Inside the Magic Kingdom at Disney World

A while ago, somebody suggested that I read Inside the Magic Kingdom by Tom Connelan. I don’t remember who it was, but I wish that I did so I could thank them. I read it in a day.

Did you know that 70% of the people that visit Disney are returning? Isn’t that amazing? What an example of customer loyaly. The book was full of little tidbits that can make a difference in your head as well as give you new techniques to use to tie your customers to you. I am going to concentrate on the seven keys that the author believes makes the difference at Disney.

The competition is anyone the customer compares you with. If your customer calls me to do business with me and I give them excellent service, might they not get used to being treated in that manner and look for all of their vendors to give that level of service?

Pay fantastic attention to detail. Not everyone will notice, but the one’s that do will be affected.

Everyone walks the talk. Everyone. President, janitor, middle manager, e-v-e-r-y-o-n-e.

Everything walks the talk. Not just people, everything. Your materials, your literature, your policy, car, building, attire must all send the same message.

Customers are best heard through many ears. Letters that they write, surveys that they complete, conversations with delivery people, billing people as well as salespeople and customer service people can give a real indication of what’s going on.

Reward, recognize and celebrate. One Disney employee compared pay and recognition to water and food. If you don’t have water, you’ll die. If you don’t have food, you’ll still die. It’ll just take longer. Employees need to be paid or they’ll go away. However, if you pay them but don’t recognize them, they’ll still go away, it’ll just take longer.

Xvxryonx makxs a diffxrxncx. This was a great example of how everyone makes a difference. Imagine typing that statement if your “e” didn’t work.

As I read this book, I found myself looking hard at myself, my co-workers as well as several clients and thought of many possibilities. Believe me when I tell you that I’ve only scratched the surface and have not done the book justice. I suggest that you get a copy at your local library, bookstore or order it here and see for yourself.


Happy Independence Day!

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7 thoughts on “Inside the Magic Kingdom at Disney World

  1. I was chatting with someone about customer service the other day, telling stories of good and bad experiences. The person I was talking to brought up Disney as a great example. He asked me, “Who do you think is the first person who can make or break the experience for you at Disney?” I thought of the ticket people, but he said the clean-up crew in the parking lot. At most companies they would be overlooked, but at Disney they are highly trained. They are the first people you tend to run into and are the ones you ask for directions. If they don’t seem friendly, informative and helpful, then your experience starts in the negative side. The moral, don’t underestimate ANY person in your company and the potential impact on the customer they can have.

  2. Absolutely! As a matter of fact, there’s a very telling example given in the book about the “clean-up” crew that I will not share here because I think that people should read the book.

  3. I was chatting with someone about customer service the other day, telling stories of good and bad experiences. The person I was talking to brought up Disney as a great example. He asked me, “Who do you think is the first person who can make or break the experience for you at Disney?” I thought of the ticket people, but he said the clean-up crew in the parking lot. At most companies they would be overlooked, but at Disney they are highly trained. They are the first people you tend to run into and are the ones you ask for directions. If they don’t seem friendly, informative and helpful, then your experience starts in the negative side.The moral, don’t underestimate ANY person in your company and the potential impact on the customer they can have.

  4. Linda Cohan sent me an email tonight after reading this post that she was the person that suggested that I read Inside the Magic Kingdom after Jenn Moore of Shepherd and Goldstein sent it to her. Linda is much to proper to remind me publicly on my blog. So, a proper thank you goes out to Linda Cohan and an additional thank you to Jenn Moore of Shepherd and Goldstein for starting the chain. Now, let’s keep it going! Incidentally, if you want to know what they are awesome at, just click their names.

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